By Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Tells the tale of a tender girl's dramatic break out from slavery through the Underground Railroad, from the viewpoint of her loved rag doll.

Show description

Read Online or Download Almost to Freedom (Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book) PDF

Best geography & cultures books

Eyewitness: Cowboy (Eyewitness Books)

Notice the real-life international of operating cowboys -- from longhorns and lariats to chuckwagons, chaps, rodeos and ranches. here's a mind-blowing and informative examine the interesting lives of cowboys from world wide. wonderful real-life photos of horses and livestock and branding irons and lariats supply a different "eyewitness" view of existence at the diversity.

The Earth Made New: Plains Indian Stories of Creation

This superbly illustrated Plains Indian construction tale celebrates a brand new Earth after the flood and narrates the making of the buffaloes, mountains, vegetation, colourful horses and Thunderbirds between others. Weaving jointly the legends of the Plains Indian tribes, together with the tales of the Cheyenne, Blackfoot, Arapaho, and the Crow, this revised version comprises eight pages of extra illustrations and tales, in addition to a brand new foreword.

How Did That Get to My House? Mail

Describes the postal prone and explains how a letter put on your mailbox can succeed in nearly a person, at any place on the planet.

Additional info for Almost to Freedom (Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book)

Example text

I’s glad to have the company. I pass the time listenin’ to Miz Mouse make herself a nest and raise her young’uns. I’s sorry when they finally go ‘cause I get to feelin’ lonely again. I get to thinkin’ that I best stop hopin’. Then one day, praise the Lord, the boards bein’ moved! Somebody’s comin’ down the ladder! If I’d a flesh-andblood heart, it woulda been poundin’ like Lindy’s that night we run off. I see light from a lantern and a woman wrappin’ up a little girl in a blanket. The child’s shiverin’, more scared, I think, than cold.

I like that. Sounds like Lindy. My face don’t change, but I smiles inside, rememberin’ the cracklin’ of the straw mattress when Lindy’d roll over me in her sleep. I sure do miss her, but I’s mighty glad to be Willa’s doll baby. It’s a right important job. AUTHOR’S NOTE I WAS INSPIRED to write Almost to Freedom during a visit to the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico. There, a display of black rag dolls from the 1800s and 1900s immediately caught my attention. “The majority of the dolls were entirely handmade from scrap cloth,” my husband read from the museum guidebook.

They talk about goin’ North to Freedom, their faces serious in the lamp light. When they settle in for sleepin’, Willa holds me in her arms and whispers, “Your name Belinda. ” Belinda. I like that. Sounds like Lindy. My face don’t change, but I smiles inside, rememberin’ the cracklin’ of the straw mattress when Lindy’d roll over me in her sleep. I sure do miss her, but I’s mighty glad to be Willa’s doll baby. It’s a right important job. AUTHOR’S NOTE I WAS INSPIRED to write Almost to Freedom during a visit to the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.89 of 5 – based on 33 votes